The Great and Powerful Osbourne

TV star Kelly Osbourne tells us why her generation will be the last to fight HIV and AIDS

BY Sunnivie Brydum

September 30 2013 11:50 AM ET

Kelly Osbourne grew up in the spotlight. As the middle child of legendary rocker and Black Sabbath front man Ozzy Osbourne and his wife, Sharon, Kelly was accustomed to having a dad who jet-setted around the world, entrancing audiences with his heavy metal sound and genre-defining music festival, Ozzfest. Kelly’s family life was put on an even wider public display when MTV cameras stepped inside the Osbourne mansion for four seasons of its hit reality show The Osbournes.
 
These days Kelly Osbourne shines in the spotlight of her own accord. Kelly and her professional dance partner took third place in the 2009 season of Dancing With the Stars, and since 2010 she’s served as a panelist and presenter on E!’s Fashion Police. The 28-year-old appeared on the July cover of Cosmopolitan, sporting lavender hair, a broad smile, and a barrage of polka dots in several different iterations.
 
But the cause closest to Osbourne’s heart is also one of her most recent endeavors. In May, Osbourne officially became the celebrity ambassador for generationCURE, a new campaign aimed at grooming the final generation of AIDS activists, coordinated by amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research. Launched in 2011, generationCURE arose from a small group of young professionals who formed a committee of fellow 20-somethings dedicated to helping amfAR speed up its search for a cure for HIV and AIDS. Last year generationCURE raised more than $50,000 toward its lofty goal to fund a new cure-focused research project that will cost $120,000. 
 
The central premise of generationCURE is that a cure for HIV and AIDS is in sight, and could be ready for commercial distribution within the lifetime of the millennial generation, the millions of people born between 1982 and 2004. Indeed, with perhaps 15 to 20 people already functionally cured of HIV, a commercially viable cure seems closer than it ever has before.

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