Scroll To Top
News

Slow Viral Clearance Speeds AIDS

Slow Viral Clearance Speeds AIDS

Coverx100_58

A study in the May 15 edition of Journal of Infectious Diseases shows that the strongest predictor of how quickly HIV disease will progress to an AIDS diagnosis is the speed at which the virus is cleared from the bloodstream after primary infection and the viral 'set point' is reached. The set point is the viral load at which viral levels remain relatively stable and begin climbing only when severe immune system damage occurs. Researchers from the Institute of Human Virology in Baltimore followed 22 HIV-positive adults and found that those who posted the greatest viral load declines during the shortest amount of time following primary infection were the least likely to have progressed to AIDS; all 11 study subjects with a slow viral load decline had progressed to AIDS by the end of the seven-year study. A high rate of initial clearance of HIV was associated with a 10-fold lower likelihood of progression to an AIDS diagnosis.

Advocate Channel - The Pride StoreOut / Advocate Magazine - Fellow Travelers & Jamie Lee Curtis

From our Sponsors

Most Popular

Latest Stories

HIV Plus Editors

Editor

Ryan is the Digital Director of The Advocate Channel, and a graduate of NYU Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing. She is also a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. While her specialties are television writing and comedy, Ryan is a young member of the LGBTQ+ community passionate about politics and advocating for all.

Ryan is the Digital Director of The Advocate Channel, and a graduate of NYU Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing. She is also a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. While her specialties are television writing and comedy, Ryan is a young member of the LGBTQ+ community passionate about politics and advocating for all.