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Researchers Scrutinize Healthy Cell�Invading Protein in HIV

Researchers Scrutinize Healthy Cell�Invading Protein in HIV

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Scientists in Australia have examined exactly why humans are unable to create antibodies that can act as a natural defense against HIV.

A study published in the journal Nature on Monday highlights a protein on the surface of HIV, gp41, which helps the virus invade cells, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corp.

"The gp41 component is the component that essentially punches a hole in the membrane or the surface of the cell and allows the virus to get in," said University of Melbourne professor Stephen Kent. "If we can prevent the HIV from getting into cells, then we'd have a great vaccine."

Early study of the protein showed that a small percentage of people (one in 1,000) can naturally resist the virus by developing an antibody against gp41. Most people, however, produce the antibody only after the virus has entered their cells and destroyed their CD4 cells.

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Ryan is the Digital Director of The Advocate Channel, and a graduate of NYU Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing. She is also a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. While her specialties are television writing and comedy, Ryan is a young member of the LGBTQ+ community passionate about politics and advocating for all.

Ryan is the Digital Director of The Advocate Channel, and a graduate of NYU Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing. She is also a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. While her specialties are television writing and comedy, Ryan is a young member of the LGBTQ+ community passionate about politics and advocating for all.